Medical Fun Facts Episode 72: Terrorist CRABs, no not that sort of crabs

Medical Fun Facts Episode 72: Terrorist CRABs, no not that sort of crabs

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  • Acinetobacter easily develop resistance, including to carbapenems, which are some of the most powerful β-lactam agents, hence CRABs or Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (the most commonly isolated species)
  • What’s the terrorist connection?
  • 12 October 2002 (error at 5 minutes 37 seconds)
  • Check the YouTube video for written words I could not say!!!
  • 202 humans died plus 2 suicide bombers with 209 injured
  • Because of the burns, victims were dousing themselves in any water they could find, much of it was contaminated with CRABs
  • http://medfunfacts.co/2002BaliBombing
  • I’d like you to actually watch the video because there are some things in it I feel comfortable writing as a 3D caption rather than saying or writing here, especially my attitude to terrorists.
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Medical Fun Facts Episode 71: Trichomonas vaginalis

Medical Fun Facts Episode 71: Trichomonas vaginalis

The focus of the review was on prevention and treatment of trichomoniasis. It took me back to my time in the Northern Territory of Australia. My friend and colleague, Professor Frank Bowden had already enabled me to introduce PCR for the detection of gonococci and chlamydia trachomatis in clinical specimens like first void urine and swabs from genitalia. At the time, there were no commercially manufactured PCR-based in vitro diagnostic devices for Trichomonas vaginalis. However, Frank was good friends with Professor Suzanne Garland who was working on a multiplex PCR IVD which would detect gonococci, Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis. The problem was that a swab specimen wasn’t big enough, so tampons were used. This approach was not welcomed by the medical laboratory scientists I worked with because they had to spend a lot of time squeezing vaginal juices containing pathogenic microorganisms from used tampons.

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Medical Fun Facts Episode 70: What is a pandemic

Medical Fun Facts Episode 70: What is a pandemic

What’s the difference between seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza?

Each season small genetic changes occur in the main circulating influenza viruses

When this happens, there is sufficient antigenic difference that our immunological memory won’t provide full protection but only some cross protection.

The changes in the antigens are usually only small, they drift a bit, hence antigenic drift.

The changes accumulate so then the difference is big enough a person who has been infected previously may get infected again and develop influenza the disease

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Medical Fun Facts Episode 69: The microbiology of a popular sexual position

Medical Fun Facts Episode 69: The microbiology of a popular sexual position

Tonight, I’m going to do my best to use medical language rather than colloquial phrases and terms. That said, some may creep in. The number 69, has a significant place in modern popular culture. For those who don’t know what I’m talking about and if you’re conservatively minded, you may not want to listen further. If you have children listening who haven’t had their home and school sexual education sessions yet, you may want them to listen in if they’re not familiar with oral sex and human health.

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Medical Fun Facts Episode 68: Congenital infections

Medical Fun Facts Episode 68: Congenital infections

Tonight, I’m talking about congenital infections

What is a congenital infection? What causes them? How are they diagnosed? How are they treated?

Congenital infections affect the fetus and neonate.

They’re often caused by viruses but bacteria and some parasites can also cause congenital infections.

The infection can occur at any period during a pregnancy.

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